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Market Research Group

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Christopher Ross
Christopher Ross

Where To Buy Used Treadmills


For example, a treadmill that has been used for brisk walking by one (lightweight) user three times a week for a year Vs. a treadmill that has been abused by three users almost every day for three years.




where to buy used treadmills


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When it comes to buying second-hand treadmills, choosing name brands will generally save you money over the long run. A used treadmill from a cheap brand will more than likely break down sooner than a trusted brand.


You can keep track of your sessions and get details about your progress. This feedback includes feedback about your running distance, heart rate, calories burned, time, number of strides, elevation gain, and so much more. Some treadmills also come with a carb counter.


If the used treadmill is made by a reputable brand, expect the seller to ask for a higher price. Conversely, the asking price will be much lower for a not-so-famous brand with sketchy records and customer reviews.


Used treadmills come in three grades: commercial grade, light commercial and home. Commercial grade equipment is designed for use in gym facilities and health clubs. It is extremely durable as it needs to withstand constant use for many hours a day. It also needs to meet the needs of a varied range of gym user, so tends to include lots of different workout programs built-in. Gyms will clean, maintain, and service their equipment regularly so you can be confident that pre-owned equipment will be in great condition.


Light commercial treadmills simply sit between full commercial and residential models. They are generally right down the middle on all facets including horsepower, tread belt size, electrical components and the overall feel of the machine.


A background check to see where your potential purchase has been is crucial. This might seem a bit overboard, but when dropping a significant chunk of change on anything electronic with moving parts, you need to know as much about it as possible.


You can ask the seller for any information regarding warranties, or a simple google search can yield quite a bit of manufacturer warranty information for most models. Some used sports equipment stores offer a limited warranty to get the unit out the door.


So, before you buy a used treadmill, get on the thing and test it out. Hit the Start button and speed it up. Also, elevate the treadmill to make sure that the tread goes all the way up. Check if a heart rate monitor works properly. And then lower it back down to make sure that it goes down properly.


Before you make a wise decision, you must check all of the buttons on the console. On most especially residential-grade treadmills you have this is nothing more than a fancy sticker. But underneath this sticker is a membrane that basically ties all of these buttons together which goes through a ribbon and communicates up to the main console board.


There are a lot of used treadmills are sold for reasonable price on online sites. The used treadmill prices are lower than the prices of new treadmill brands. You can buy a used treadmill for a third of the going price range. The average price for a used treadmill in good condition can range from $300 to over $800.


There are plenty of great options available for home use treadmills. The right treadmill for you will be based on your budget, fitness goals, and any space limitations. You can check out our list of Best Treadmills for Home Use to get in-depth information and reviews on the top treadmills on the market.


While you can potentially save a lot of money by buying a used treadmill, the problems you may encounter with your machine down the line may not be worth it. When purchasing a used treadmill, make sure you thoroughly examine the machine for any defects.


We offer a full selection of ellipticals, treadmills, exercise bikes and home gyms from top brands such as Precor, Life Fitness, Cybex, True, Vision and others. Our 19,000 square foot superstore in University Hills Plaza on Colorado Blvd. and Yale Ave. has approximately 4,000 square feet of used equipment which has been tested, cleaned and repaired if needed so you may buy with complete confidence.


Your best bet if you are going to buy used and are concerned about belt quality is to hop on and go for a test run for at least five minutes or so, if the seller will let you. This way you can at least feel how the belt is moving under your feet. If you feel any friction at all or the belt sounds noisy, this could be an indication that the belt is starting to get worn out on the underside.


The next big issue that will prove to be a rather large drawback with purchasing a treadmill used is that you will get no warranty support. Even if the treadmill is quite new, often the warranty will only cover the original buyer, so as soon as it passes hands, that warranty is no longer valid.


With used treadmills, the unfortunate thing is that sometimes the motor can seem okay when you first use the treadmill for half an hour or so, but then it will start to die out when you begin going for longer runs, or multiple users are doing treadmill sessions.


Make sure that you also return back down on the incline as well as sometimes treadmills go up fine, but down is another story. If the treadmill jerks at any point on the decent or begins to falter when ascending, this is a good sign this feature is not going to be working soon.


Experts estimate there are hundreds of thousands of treadmill desks in the wild today, and most certainly there are well over 100,000 commercially produced office treadmill bases that have been sold since 2007. The rest? DIY-hacked running treadmills paired with either a commercially-produced, adjustable-height desk or some kind of home-built raised desk surface.


That said, there are other options for used treadmills that can endure the punishment of slow-walking, requiring the belt to drag along your dead weight while overcoming friction with the deck. Specifically, any true walking treadmill, crossover treadmill or rehab treadmill that has a top speed of no more than 5 mph, or any cardio running treadmill built with an AC motor (i.e. real gym equipment, so expect an original price tag of $6K+) will last you a whole lot longer than a cheaply-produced, home-grade running treadmills. And bear in mind these will generally be noisier and less energy-efficient than DC-motor-equipped treadmill.


The good news is that if the treadmill was used exclusively for walking, not running, it probably has relatively low miles on it and plenty of life left in the belt and deck. The G forces from running are relatively murderous to belts and decks.


You might choose to walk or run inside on a treadmill for any number of reasons: inclement weather, dark conditions, unwelcoming terrain, commitments that keep you at home. Whether your goal is a couple of no-frills miles or a full-blown immersive workout, a treadmill can be a useful and convenient training tool. After walking and running on 24 treadmills over the past six years, we think the NordicTrack Commercial 1750 is a great choice for people who are looking for a dependable, versatile machine with a smooth ride and a sturdy build. Its straightforward design is easy to navigate, and it has a color touchscreen, Bluetooth connectivity, and an optional subscription to on-board workout content if you need an extra dose of motivation.


A good treadmill inclines at gradients from just short of flat to pretty steep. This feature allows you to mimic the stress of exercise on hilly terrain as well as do interval work, which is beneficial for varying your training to help you reach speed goals and for keeping your daily exercise interesting. The least-expensive residential treadmills typically have just one or two incline settings (and some cheaper models require you to manually adjust the incline). For light walkers, that might be enough, but a machine that offers variety may be more useful in the long run.


The stated weight capacity for residential treadmills (and entry-level commercial models) is typically 300 to 325 pounds; nearly all the treadmills we tested accommodate at least this much weight. (The highest maximum user weight we had during our latest round of testing was 375 pounds.) Treadmills with much higher weight capacities tend to be more expensive and have much shorter belts, as they are designed more for walking. Treadmills that accommodate weights over 400 pounds are rare.


We paid attention to noise. Though all of the treadmills were loud, some were whinier or produced louder footfall noises than others. Some also made annoyingly shrill or loud recorded sounds, which we could often turn down or off, when they were turning on or gearing up.


Many treadmills have built-in fans designed to blow air on the runner. When a treadmill had a fan, we turned it on at full blast for some of our runs. Most treadmill fans are small and poorly positioned. If a fan with real cooling capabilities is important to you, consider a portable option such as the Vornado 630, a nice pick for a home gym because of its small size; it blows at over 17 mph.


We assessed the connectivity of treadmills that offer Bluetooth, onboard subscription content, or the ability to mesh with separately streamed workouts from apps. Peloton and iFit (available on NordicTrack machines) are the two subscription-based apps we tried in-depth. Peloton classes can be viewed on the Tread or on a separate device via the Peloton app. iFit workouts can be viewed on a compatible NordicTrack or ProForm treadmill or on a separate device via the iFit app.


A pair of water-bottle holders on either side of the display housed our bottle securely. Five small bins in a shelf underneath the console offer ample room for storing odds and ends. A pair of three-speed fans provided a cooling blast.


If you want an ultra-sturdy, minimalist treadmill with a firm deck: The LifeSpan Fitness TR4000i is a good choice. We preferred the more responsive deck on the Sole, but if that treadmill is unavailable, this could be a solid backup option. The TR4000i felt the sturdiest of all the treadmills we tested in 2019, and it was among the easiest to assemble. (A member of our operations team put it together in no time, noting later how its clear instructions and simple parts helped expedite the process.) 041b061a72


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