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Charles Vorontsov
Charles Vorontsov

The Eye That Sees Itself


Saying the mantra is simply our beginning on the path to this selfless attention, to taking the searchlight of consciousness off ourselves. We become like the eye that cannot see itself, that sees all. We begin to see . . . . everything as Christ sees it. In other words, we begin to see with his light.




The Eye That Sees Itself



Entoptic images have a physical basis in the image cast upon the retina. Hence, they are different from optical illusions, which are caused by the visual system and characterized by a visual percept that (loosely said) appears to differ from reality. Because entoptic images are caused by phenomena within the observer's own eye, they share one feature with optical illusions and hallucinations: the observer cannot share a direct and specific view of the phenomenon with others.


Helmholtz[1] commented on entoptic phenomena which could be seen easily by some observers, but could not be seen at all by others. This variance is not surprising because the specific aspects of the eye that produce these images are unique to each individual. Because of the variation between individuals, and the inability for two observers to share a nearly identical stimulus, these phenomena are unlike most visual sensations. They are also unlike most optical illusions which are produced by viewing a common stimulus. Yet, there is enough commonality between the main entoptic phenomena that their physical origin is now well understood.


A phenomenon that could be entoptical if the eyelashes are considered to be part of the eye is seeing light diffracted through the eyelashes. The phenomenon appears as one or more light disks crossed by dark blurry lines (the shadows of the lashes), each having fringes of spectral colour. The disk shape is given by the circular aperture of the pupil.


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So today, I release all need to know. I am also going to work on releasing the want to know and remember that when it is time for me to understand, when the Ultimate knows I need to understand, I will. Until then, it is what it is, nothing more, and nothing less.


Although we often take the ability to see for granted, this ability derives from sets of complex mathematical transformations that we are not yet able to reproduce in a computer, according to Sharpee. In fact, more than a third of our brain is devoted exclusively to the task of parsing visual scenes.


Credit: Salk InstituteOur visual perception starts in the eye with light and dark pixels. These signals are sent to the back of the brain to an area called V1 where they are transformed to correspond to edges in the visual scenes. Somehow, as a result of several subsequent transformations of this information, we then can recognize faces, cars and other objects and whether they are moving. How precisely this recognition happens is still a mystery, in part because neurons that encode objects respond in complicated ways.


Which part of your body lets you read the back of a cereal box, check out a rainbow, and see a softball heading your way? Which part lets you cry when you're sad and makes tears to protect itself? Which part has muscles that adjust to let you focus on things that are close up or far away? If you guessed the eye, you're right!


The eyelid also has great reflexes, which are automatic body responses, that protect the eye. When you step into bright light, for example, the eyelids squeeze together tightly to protect your eyes until they can adjust to the light. And if you flutter your fingers close (but not too close!) to your friend's eyes, you'll be sure to see your friend's eyes blink. Your friend's eyelids shut automatically to protect the eye from possible danger. And speaking of fluttering, don't forget eyelashes. They work with the eyelids to keep dirt and other unwanted stuff out of your eyes.


The white part of the eyeball is called the sclera (say: SKLAIR-uh). The sclera is made of a tough material and has the important job of covering most of the eyeball. Think of the sclera as your eyeball's outer coat. Look very closely at the white of the eye, and you'll see lines that look like tiny pink threads. These are blood vessels, the tiny tubes that deliver blood, to the sclera.


Behind the cornea are the iris, the pupil, and the anterior chamber. The iris (say: EYE-riss) is the colorful part of the eye. When we say a person has blue eyes, we really mean the person has blue irises! The iris has muscles attached to it that change its shape. This allows the iris to control how much light goes through the pupil (say: PYOO-pul).


The anterior (say: AN-teer-ee-ur) chamber is the space between the cornea and the iris. This space is filled with a special transparent fluid that nourishes the eye and keeps it healthy.


Your retina is in the very back of the eye. It holds millions of cells that are sensitive to light. The retina takes the light the eye receives and changes it into nerve signals so the brain can understand what the eye is seeing.


The optic nerve serves as a high-speed telephone line connecting the eye to the brain. When you see an image, your eye "telephones" your brain with a report on what you are seeing so the brain can translate that report into "cat," "apple," or "bicycle," or whatever the case may be.


The most obvious effect diplopia has on your body is the double vision itself. In addition to the physical symptoms, it can be scary when something affects your eyesight. The good news is that almost 90% of cases of double vision are temporary and have no long-term or serious implications for your health. But diplopia can decrease your depth perception, making driving or walking more difficult.


Keratoconus occurs when your cornea (the clear part of your eye that you see through) loses its shape. Usually, your corneas are round, but keratoconus causes your cornea to bulge outward like a cone. This distorted shape causes vision issues, including diplopia.


Crabs are unable to move their eyes, but the creatures have an excellent visual field that helps them spot predators and prey. For instance, the fiddler crab (Uca vomeris) can see all around itself, including overhead, according to a 2009 study published in the Journal of Experimental Biology. The eye cells on top of the crab's stalks can perceive light and dark, but not fine detail. "The crab only needs to see one dark spot moving in its upward vision to know it must run for its burrow," study co-author Jan Hemmi, a senior lecturer of biology at the University of Western Australia said in a statement.


Like the cat, the crocodile is an ambush predator that has vertical-slit pupils to help it gauge distance when it attacks prey. The two animals also share another similarity: Both have nighttime vision. The crocodile has a layer of reflective, mirrored crystals behind its retinas. During the day, a pigment in these crystals acts like a pair of sunglasses. But at night, the pigment cells retract, allowing the crystals to reflect light back onto the retina, amplifying the strength of the image. This allows the crocodile to essentially see in the dark.


When the cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) is exposed to bright light, its pupil takes on a W-like shape. But when the animal is in dim or dark waters, the cuttlefish's pupils become circular. Why does this happen? According to a 2013 study in the journal Vision Research, the narrow, W-shaped pupil helps the cuttlefish balance uneven, vertically traveling light. This cuts down the amount of sunlight that is scattered across the cuttlefish's lens, making it easier for the animals to see contrasting images, the researchers of the study said. 041b061a72


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